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After reviewing past posts, I have learned a lot about the number system for Copics. Each letter describes the color and the numbers reflect the saturation, right? To blend well, you should use markers with letters in the same level. The lower the number, the lower the saturation, I think. B05, B07 & B09 should work well; another grouping would be B12, B14, B16. What do you do if the #'s are widespread but still in the same group, like B23, B26 & B29. Can RV02 & RV04 blend with RV10? I realize the higher the number, the darker the color. My problem is the two sets of Ciao markers I have do not always include numbers close together in same level of saturation. Am I getting this right?

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Yes you are, Sharon.  If you don't have the next level up... you can always use your Blender to do tip to brush colors.  Just touch the blender to the one you want and it can produce the next shade lighter.  Practice on scratch paper first.  Hope that helps.

If my #'s are that far apart (i.e. B23 and B26) I usually use the B23 and build on that color to get a medium between the two (if that makes any sense at all.  Maybe someone else has more insight.  Good question, though!

See, I knew someone else would have more insight.  Thanks, Tina.  I didn't see your post before I answered.  Great tip.

Thank you! Wow -- that was quick!

Ok, I'm getting it, but for more confusion,

looking at my chart & reading #'s best I can, I have:

B00, B05

B23, B24, B29

B32.

What would you do with that? BTW, this isn't a test! Think about it & take your time. I'm playing with this CMC Copic Marker Color Chart that has broadened my life to the World of Copics! Either fun or crazy, I'm not sure, get back to you on that!

LOL Sharon... I was going to direct you to CMC.  I am the DT Leader over at CMC.  Let me look at what I have at my desk in a minute.  You CAN blend colors together if need be... layering on top.  But I'm not at my desk right now.

Wow--these responses are opening so many doors I'm practically running from one to the other then back again!

Your clarification helps. I sorta-kinda-almost had that but needed the specifics to really see the light. (omg look how I put that!)

One more question: I'm blessed with several  "00's" but now I'm hearing more need for "000's" -- what's the difference? How can you add more zero to zero? Or is that not a zero? lol I'm getting silly now, but that's a real question. Then I'll quit bugging you. Or at least I'll try.

Thank you! :) All of you!

All of this help has been tremendous, & I really do understand the Copic numbering system better. Thanks for your replies!

HI Thank you that was a lot of information but ohohoh did it make sense.  Now it is to retain it. You guys are great!!

Colleen, GKD DT said:

Well, you are almost there!  You are pretty close to the right idea, but you have one thing more than needs to be clarified.  The numbers that you see actually represent TWO different things.  The first number is saturation (amount of pure color) and the second number is shade.  You need to have markers from the same family, the same saturation and two or three digits difference in the shade... So... B00/B04/B06 will all work together (Same letter "B" - same first number "0")

BUT...  B24/B26/B32 would NOT work... because they have different saturations.  The first number is a "2" on the first two but jumps to a "3" on the third one...

Not that we would never blend these all together, but you need to know that it's not one running number ... like 18/19/20/21...  they are two different things... one eight, one nine, two zero, two one....  and the blending group changes with each jump in first number.

That should help you pick good blending groups. 

Let's look at all of the natural blending groups in the Blue family...

You have:

B00/B01/B02/B04/B05/B06

B12/B14/B16/B18

B21/B23/B24/B26/B28/B29

B32/B34/B37/B39

B41/B45

B60/B63/B66/B69

B79

B91/B93/B95/B97/B99

So you can see that there are 6 blending groups in the blue with multiple shades to choose from and then one that has only two (B4's) and then you have a lone dark shade with B79. When you have these "loner" colors, you can use them to color and shade with other saturations... that gets into more intermediate color theory stuff.. but it is possible.  The key is to pick a light, medium and a dark shade to color with...

Does that make sense?  Please let us know if you have more questions!

Hugs!

Colleen Schaan

What is CMC?

Tina Gilliland, GKD DT said:

LOL Sharon... I was going to direct you to CMC.  I am the DT Leader over at CMC.  Let me look at what I have at my desk in a minute.  You CAN blend colors together if need be... layering on top.  But I'm not at my desk right now.

I didn't research before I bought Copics. I bought the primary and secondary tones sets. NOW that I have been reading on the net I see I should have chosen colors depending on what I like and then bought in sets of three because what I have bought isn't going to work out.

 

Are you familiar with what I've bought? When I receive them will I just need to then go buy the complementary colors in the same grouping. I understand now that I want to do 0's 1's or 2's as a basis for buying the three colors.  Did I mess up alot in buying what I did? Sigh I thought primary and secondary and my mind said those would be good beginning starting points. For the money (got them at Dick  Blick) I really should have researched.

 

I read somewhere that Gina has a list of ten or twelve colors that are a good basis to start. Is that true? I haven't seen that on the site.

 

Thanks you all for any help and I hope you can understand my muddled questions.

I concur!!  I just learned so much from reading this!  Thanks a bunch!

Rita C Robles said:

HI Thank you that was a lot of information but ohohoh did it make sense.  Now it is to retain it. You guys are great!!

Colleen, GKD DT said:

Well, you are almost there!  You are pretty close to the right idea, but you have one thing more than needs to be clarified.  The numbers that you see actually represent TWO different things.  The first number is saturation (amount of pure color) and the second number is shade.  You need to have markers from the same family, the same saturation and two or three digits difference in the shade... So... B00/B04/B06 will all work together (Same letter "B" - same first number "0")

BUT...  B24/B26/B32 would NOT work... because they have different saturations.  The first number is a "2" on the first two but jumps to a "3" on the third one...

Not that we would never blend these all together, but you need to know that it's not one running number ... like 18/19/20/21...  they are two different things... one eight, one nine, two zero, two one....  and the blending group changes with each jump in first number.

That should help you pick good blending groups. 

Let's look at all of the natural blending groups in the Blue family...

You have:

B00/B01/B02/B04/B05/B06

B12/B14/B16/B18

B21/B23/B24/B26/B28/B29

B32/B34/B37/B39

B41/B45

B60/B63/B66/B69

B79

B91/B93/B95/B97/B99

So you can see that there are 6 blending groups in the blue with multiple shades to choose from and then one that has only two (B4's) and then you have a lone dark shade with B79. When you have these "loner" colors, you can use them to color and shade with other saturations... that gets into more intermediate color theory stuff.. but it is possible.  The key is to pick a light, medium and a dark shade to color with...

Does that make sense?  Please let us know if you have more questions!

Hugs!

Colleen Schaan

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