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I first purchased Set A of Copic Ciao, then later purchased Set B. Are these in certain order in the box for a reason? I realize the numbers are in order by color, but when you've got Set A then get Set B, there are blues in both boxes, reds in both, etc. Is it just as well to keep all colors together in order by number? I feel like I'm missing part of the purpose of the chart.

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Hi Sharon - the colors are numbered based on their tone and color saturation.  If you have a color chart, which is laid out in a big circle, it will help you to see how the colors go together.  This is important when you want to blend and shade yet stay within the right tones.  The first letter(s) in the numbering system is the color family. R = Red, RV - Red Violet, BG = Blue Green, etc.  Copicmarker.com explains this really well. Also, I just found a blog site the other day with excellent videos on using copics and how to get different effects - shading, feathering, blending, etc.  Go to http://www.scrapbitz.blogspot.com/ and check out Suzanne Dean's blog.  this should get you started and help you make sense of the numbering system.  Another great blog is Marianne Walker's blog at http://ilikemarkers.blogspot.com/ - she's fabulous as well.  Good luck.  Hope this helped.



Well said Tracy!

Wow! Thank you so much for that. I understand better already! The R, RV, etc. made sense to me & I could see the change in color but never got past that. Your explanation helped and I will check those sites as soon as I get a chance this weekend.

Sharon, it is also all about the paper, and both those sites are awesome!  Please ask & share things you've found out, like I found out Windex cleans the outside of the markers when they get marked up when your coloring.

Good point Krystal.  Sharon, the Gina K Pure Luxury cardstock (white or ivory) in either the 120# or layering weight styles are the preferred cardstocks of most all copic users.  The 120# weight is best for those images you want to color where you won't be layering as the markers do not bleed through the paper.

Krystal - thanks for the tip about using Windex to clean the outside of the markers - never knew that!

Tracy, I can't afford to waste my colorless re-inker frivolously, lol.

Tracy Palmer said:

Good point Krystal.  Sharon, the Gina K Pure Luxury cardstock (white or ivory) in either the 120# or layering weight styles are the preferred cardstocks of most all copic users.  The 120# weight is best for those images you want to color where you won't be layering as the markers do not bleed through the paper.

Krystal - thanks for the tip about using Windex to clean the outside of the markers - never knew that!

Regular rubbing alcohol is cheaper than Windex and does an excellent job cleaning the outside of pens and insides of caps.

These comments are all very helpful. I seem to have a huge mess all over my hands & fingers by the time I get done with the markers. Goes for ink, too.

Have you'all ever heard of Core'dinations "dust Buddy?" It is a cloth (like cheesecloth texture) with some kind of coating on it that is supposed to help keep inks, dust, etc. from messing up projects. I found one at Michaels but am not sure I'm using it right.

Mrs. Margaret, what "degree" of alcohol is it?

I finally sat down last night and checked out these sites. Awesome! Thank you for the links. I was so enthralled I stayed up until nearly 3 AM reviewing nearly everything they had. Poor cat tried to unplug my laptop just to get some attention! I printed the Copic Color Chart and filled in the colors I have. That really helped me see how the colors look beside each other. There's more to learn but at least I've started. Now if I could win the lottery I could purchase more markers!

Tracy Palmer said:

Hi Sharon - the colors are numbered based on their tone and color saturation.  If you have a color chart, which is laid out in a big circle, it will help you to see how the colors go together.  This is important when you want to blend and shade yet stay within the right tones.  The first letter(s) in the numbering system is the color family. R = Red, RV - Red Violet, BG = Blue Green, etc.  Copicmarker.com explains this really well. Also, I just found a blog site the other day with excellent videos on using copics and how to get different effects - shading, feathering, blending, etc.  Go to http://www.scrapbitz.blogspot.com/ and check out Suzanne Dean's blog.  this should get you started and help you make sense of the numbering system.  Another great blog is Marianne Walker's blog at http://ilikemarkers.blogspot.com/ - she's fabulous as well.  Good luck.  Hope this helped.



I was confused at first also however, there are two great books on the market all about Copics.  They are "Copic Coloring Guide, and Copic Coloring Guide, Level 2 - Nature. They are both available at Annie's Attic.com.  I learned that a "set" of markers, all with different numbers, but having the same color family is their simple way of stating that those 3 colors (or set of 4 colors) "go" together as a color combo.  I am a Stampin Up Demo and although I love Stampin Up markers, the Copics are like butter on the page.  Yes, they are more expensive, but the result is outstanding. I use both the Stampin Up and Copics and am pleased with both products.  Hope this helps!

Just wanted to say a big THANK YOU to all who helped me with this. I've been creating my own blending shades with the colorless marker if I don't have the right number/color/shade to use. What a relief to my budget!

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